This Artist Uses Wire To Create Incredible Drawings In The Air

By definition, sculpture is three dimensional — and by most accounts, that’s what makes it great. Looking at a free-standing work of art that’s been attended to on all sides is a wholly unique experience, and the impact of viewing sculptures often carries with it a sense of immediacy.

And that’s what makes the sculptural work of Switzerland-based artist Gavin Worth paradoxical in the best way. His wire sculptures combine the emotive nature of free-standing pieces with the intricacy of depicting human faces on a two-dimensional plane.

After working as a designer for years, Worth latched onto one mantra: “Simplify, simplify, simplify.” As he explained to My Modern Met, “You definitely can’t be self-indulgent in design. You’re forced to focus on very clear, very economical communication.”

Art is a communicative force and a matter of translation. “I could feel love more intensely than anyone has ever felt love before,” he continued, “but if I can’t communicate to someone else what that feels like, then it’s just self-indulgence.”

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While his pieces read like two-dimensional drawings that float in thin air, a simple light change adds a third dimension to the visual experience of his work.

And that’s where his stories come to life. He avoids presenting the false version of human physicality that’s become most palatable to audiences today. Instead, Worth explores the imperfections of which we’ve unfortunately grown weary.

(via My Modern Met)

The idea here is to create pieces that serve as points of departure, leaving viewers with the sense that they’ve experienced a visual narrative. Just as writers put pen to paper, Gavin Worth writes stories in the ink of bent wires.

To see more of Worth’s work and learn about upcoming exhibitions, be sure to check out his website.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/gavin-worth-sculpture/

This Artist Puts A Disturbing Twist On Something We All Loved As Kids

When it comes to embodying all things innocuous, toys reign supreme.

Whether they’re fashion-savvy Barbies or Star Wars-themed LEGOs, playthings are consistently innocent. That’s kind of the point. While we deal with the incessant onslaught of adulthood and its many harsh realities, little ones get to whittle away the hours in the company of their favorite plastic, plushy friends.

But one artist and toy designer by the name of Jason Freeny (previously) puts a deliciously dark spin on childhood staples like balloon animals and gummy bears.

As the son of a costume designer and a professor of sculpture and painting, Freeny was destined for quirky, artistic greatness.

The multidisciplinary creator’s career really took off after he started building anatomical toy sculptures in 2007.

Drawing influence from the likes of Andy Warhol and M.C. Escher, Freeny’s work is at once whimsical and twisted.

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There’s something refreshing about his flair for butting the frigidity of scientifically accurate anatomy up against the frivolity of toys that we all recognize.

Over the years, his designs have been picked up and produced by toy companies in Hong Kong and the U.S.

The best part? You can build some of these sculptures yourself!

(via BoredPanda)

It’s not often that we’re invited to spend some time inside an artist’s mind, so if you want to pick up a few models, head over to Amazon. For regular updates, pay Jason Freeny’s website a visit — and you should follow him on Facebook and Instagram while you’re at it!

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/anatomical-balloon-animals/