This Is What A Plus Size Fitness Fashion Shoot Looks Like

Bust’s “Let’s Get Physical” fashion spread offers five women who are embracing fitness — and their curves.

1. The latest issue of Bust magazine includes an activewear shoot — with a twist. All of the models are considered “plus size” by the modeling industry.

BUST Magazine/Danielle St. Laurent

2. The shoot features a roster of models from the ALDA modeling agency, which bills itself as a group of women aiming to represent beauty in all sizes.

BUST Magazine/Danielle St. Laurent

That’s Danielle Redman on the left and Enga Eiriksdottir on the right. Models Ashley Graham, Julie Henderson, and Marquita Pring were also featured in the shoot.

3. This is Marquita Pring, who notes that “there’s no such thing as the perfect body. A thin woman is beautiful, a curvy woman is beautiful, and everything in-between is beautiful.”

BUST Magazine/Danielle St. Laurent

Hard agree.

4. The aim of the shoot? To promote that idea that women can be healthy and fit at any size.

BUST Magazine/Danielle St. Laurent

5. “Every body is beautiful and every body is different,” said Redman. “Some people are meant to be a size negative zero and some people are meant to be a size 16.”

Bust Magazine / Danielle St. Laurent

6. Check out this behind-the-scenes look at the shoot.

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/juliegerstein/this-is-what-a-plus-size-fitness-fashion-shoot-looks-like

Leonard Nimoy Did A Stunning Photo Series Celebrating Gloriously Full-Figured Women

The Full Body Project included women of all shapes and sizes who clearly love their curves. NSFW due to nudity.

1. In 2007, Star Trek actor Leonard Nimoy, who also happened to be a prolific photographer, published his collection The Full Body Project.

Nimoy challenged modern standards of beauty with the engaging photographs, presenting the subjects as staring the viewer in the face, unashamed of their figures.

Leonard Nimoy / R. Michaelson Galleries

3. Nimoy, who died Friday at the age of 83, had previously photographed slimmer nude figures, but this series starred the fuller-figured members of a burlesque group called The Fat-Bottom Revue.

He was inspired after a full-figured woman asked him to take her and her friends’ pictures, CBS reported.

Leonard Nimoy / R. Michaelson Galleries

5. “The average American woman weighs 25% more than the models selling the clothes,” Nimoy wrote. “There is a huge industry built up around selling women ways to get their bodies closer to the fantasy ideal.”

“Pills, diets, surgery, workout programs,” he added. “The message is, ‘You don’t look right. If you buy our product, you can get there.'”

Leonard Nimoy / R. Michaelson Galleries

7. Nimoy was bothered by the knowledge that many women felt at least some shame for their figures, author Natalie Angier, who wrote The Full Body Project‘s introduction, told Mashable.

“It really disturbed him that women who considered themselves overweight had this terrible feeling about themselves,” she said. “He wanted to show the world that there’s beauty to be found in different body types.”

Leonard Nimoy / R. Michaelson Galleries

9. Angier said she was inspired by the powerfulness embodied by the women in the photographs, in which they presented themselves free of embarrassment or insecurity.

Leonard Nimoy / R. Michaelson Galleries

11. “I admire the way he presented the women as standing there looking the viewer full in the face,” she said. “Saying look at me — I’m entitled to stand here and present myself to the world. I don’t have to be ashamed and cower in the corner.”

Leonard Nimoy / R. Michaelson Galleries

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/rachelzarrell/leonard-nimoy-full-body-project-photography